View Ideas

What ideas do you think would transform 106 Street and 76 Avenue into walkable, bikeable, liveable places that connect people? 

Throughout the process, Community Partners will be invited to submit their ideas. To keep up-to-date on opportunities, become a Community Partner (we’ll send invites straight to your email account).

Ideas submitted will be evaluated according to the Engage 106-76 Vision and Principles. Some ideas may be implementable in the Concept Plan, others may be better left for a different initiative. Either way, be creative, have fun, and keep problem-solving together to get to WALK BIKE LIVE.

Here are some ideas submitted by Community Partners so far:

 

I recommend putting bicycle path on University Avenue. This was very favourably received by those within my group at the October 6th session. (I am surprised this suggestion didn’t make your www site)  Generally – if there is room, put physical separation concrete in this shape /\ as I have seen on the Burrard bridge in Vancouver(see attached photo). These concrete dividers could be tested and removed if they don’t work and/or removed in winter to facilitate snow clearing of roads. Phyiscal separation would make both bicycle and car drivers feel safer.

Phyiscal separation makes both bicycle and car drivers feel safer. (1a, 1b, 3)    THere are multiple examples globally of doing this using fixed concrete, removeable concrete, planters, metal poles, etc…  And clearly it would promote the principle I am proposing

burrardbridgecycletrack

Principles

  • 1a. Accommodate all users by recognising the needs of all transportation types, including walking, biking, motor vehicles, and public transit.
  • 1b. Accommodate all users by giving transportation priority to the most vulnerable road user (example: child over  adult, or pedestrian over cyclist.
  • 3. Function at the human scale, ensuring all road users feel safe in their choice of transportation.

 

Consolidate bike lanes on one side of 76 Avenue. (north side) (removes danger of opening car doors for cyclists)  Vehicle parking on one side of the street (south side)  No ‘bump outs’ for pedestrians that force cyclists out into vehicle traffic, the cycle lanes will narrow the crossing distance anyways. Make pedestrian crossings very noticeable on the pavement itself and with appropriate signage.   Widen sidewalk on side of the street with bike lanes. (It will become a nicer place to walk away from vehicular traffic) (primary walking route to LRT) try to mitigate signage intrusion on walking space – (a ‘sign zone’ 50cm wide next to the street and then generous sidewalk beyond?)

screen_shot_20151027_at_21.23.57

Principles

  • 1a. Accommodate all users by recognising the needs of all transportation types, including walking, biking, motor vehicles, and public transit.
  • 1b. Accommodate all users by giving transportation priority to the most vulnerable road user (example: child over  adult, or pedestrian over cyclist.
  • 3. Function at the human scale, ensuring all road users feel safe in their choice of transportation.
  • 4. Act as showcase streets that celebrate the community’s beauty, history, commerce, residents,  and encourage future quality infill redevelopment.

Folks, I agree that 76th Ave and 106 Street is dangerous. Countless times I have seen people run through the stop signs. Speed bumps and perhaps the blinking red signal light are the most economic way to proceed.  Ok, some want a bike corridor, some want no change, some want a one way. Ultimately, some people are going to lose. We have to accommodate those also who have limited mobility, seniors and those who choose not to cycle.     We cannot just push traffic onto the adjacent streets. I can say that in Allendale people are irate over this. Let me tell y’all, riots will occur if this happens. This can be evaded.  My two cents is to do the speed bump/blinky red light on 76th Ave., still allow two way traffic on 106 Street, create protective barriers for cyclists on 106 Street and add speed bumps along 106 Street as required in other areas.  Fyi, I ride my Ghost bike almost daily. I stay away from the bike lanes due to nearly getting smoked on a number of occasions.   Cheers.

Principles:

  • 1a. Accommodate all users by recognising the needs of all transportation types, including walking, biking, motor vehicles, and public transit.

76 avenue east bound over 114th Street Appropriate provisions(lanes) for traffic wishing to travel EASTBOUND ONLY  through the intersection. Thusly not having to wait in a long long lineup with traffic that is turning left (south) onto 114th street. This is a failure at every level and stage of the project.

Common sense at ground level, and superior use of area If you need to understand more, contact me to draw it out in detail.

Principles

  • 1a. Accommodate all users by recognising the needs of all transportation types, including walking, biking, motor vehicles, and public transit.
  • 1b. Accommodate all users by giving transportation priority to the most vulnerable road user (example: child over  adult, or pedestrian over cyclist.
  • 1c. Designing corridors as part of a larger network of roads, to get all people where they need to go using their choice of transportation.
  • 2. Serve as community bridges, connecting neighbours along, across and within the corridors.
  • 3. Function at the human scale, ensuring all road users feel safe in their choice of transportation.
  • 4. Act as showcase streets that celebrate the community’s beauty, history, commerce, residents,  and encourage future quality infill redevelopment.

Let me describe a dream for 76 Ave. We would have a variety of local services, a car repair garage, a general grocery store, a bank branch, a lunch-counter – coffee shop, a restaurant, a barber shop, a hardware store (yes- incredible), a drug store, a book store and a very friendly fire hall. Believe it or not, this was what we had when we came to Belgravia in 1969. It was very convenient.  Now we have a snack food store, two restaurants, a barber shop, a law office, an engineering firm office, an office for medical doctors and a fire hall. The food store provides mainly snack food – potato chips and sugar-loaded pop, for junior high students.

The advantages of what we had over what we have now are obvious re selection and proximity. Now the closest malls are Calgary Trail (at 76 Ave), Lendrum and Southgate and they are mostly clothes, banks and food.  I would definitely define reverting to our original servies as providing as “quality infill”. It also speaks to the time-tested “historical” dimension of your Fourth Principle.  I am hopeful that the plans to increase the zoning density of Lower Belgravia would provide enough of population to warrant to revising the commercial vialbility of the area from a big box (think SEd Common 20 miles away) to a quaint Bel-Mac Village Square model. Oh well I can dream.

 

Principles

  • 4. Act as showcase streets that celebrate the community’s beauty, history, commerce, residents,  and encourage future quality infill redevelopment.

Remove boulevards and widen sidewalks to make separate bike  and walking lanes.

Discreet lanes for bikes, cars and pedestrian traffic will accommodate diverse transportation types and increase safety for all users

Principles:

  • 1a. Accommodate all users by recognising the needs of all transportation types, including walking, biking, motor vehicles, and public transit.

 

To allow for a bike way and walking as well as parking and trafic.  I think that 106 should be one way from 76 ave to 68ave going in a southern direction.

The road will be less congensted and busy.  It can be made narrower at the cross walks for pedestirian crossing.  Bikes and walkers can be protected from vehicles that may loose control.    This type of construction will attract alot more carbon frendly transportation methods.  If done right it will make the neighboor hood more attractive to people who are commited to reducing there carbon foot print and reduce the distance they commute to work.  We should support these type of people to find a place that enables them to do this.  communters who use the streets as short cuts are only using the neighboorhood infrastructure for there own benifit and do not contribute at all to increasing the livability for the local residences.  I think commuting through the neighborhood should be reduced for safety, livability, and environmental benifits.

Principles

  • 1b. Accommodate all users by giving transportation priority to the most vulnerable road user (example: child over  adult, or pedestrian over cyclist.
  • 3. Function at the human scale, ensuring all road users feel safe in their choice of transportation.
  • 4. Act as showcase streets that celebrate the community’s beauty, history, commerce, residents,  and encourage future quality infill redevelopment.

We planned several cycle tracks at workshop last night. Since there are fewer cyclists in winter, maybe they could double as windrows. As long as, 1) they get cleared early in spring, 2) bikes are permitted on sidewalks when cycle track is closed for winter, and 3) “winter” is defined to the short end (e.g. Dec to Feb) since there are still snow free days.

Recognises greater number of cyclists in non-snow times but doesn’t tie up space when little used.

Principles:

  • 1c. Designing corridors as part of a larger network of roads, to get all people where they need to go using their choice of transportation.

 

I would like to see the City educate road users: -increased signage in school zones, to educate and remind drivers of the need to share with pedestrians; -educational programs for cyclists, so they understand how to interact with other forms of traffic (eg. cyclists are in danger when they ride, rather than walk, their bikes in crosswalks). Perhaps this education can start young – school programs for example, signs at crosswalks to remind cyclists.

I think all road users need to be reminded of basic rules, and as often as possible. Signs and educational programs could be integrated into the structure of this re-design, so that drivers are more aware of when they need to slow down, and cyclists understand that they need to take care at intersections, either choosing to ride on the road or walking their bikes across crosswalks as pedestrians. This is especially important with children, who often seem to think they are magically protected at intersections, even when this results in their darting unexpectedly onto the road. Even careful drivers have difficulty predicting a fast-moving bike on a crosswalk.

Principles

  • 1a. Accommodate all users by recognising the needs of all transportation types, including walking, biking, motor vehicles, and public transit.
  • 1b. Accommodate all users by giving transportation priority to the most vulnerable road user (example: child over  adult, or pedestrian over cyclist.
  • 3. Function at the human scale, ensuring all road users feel safe in their choice of transportation.

106 ST, Between 57 and 51 ave Get rid of the one-way traffic, as it makes it particularly difficult for those living ON 106th to go southbound, particularly to the Rexall Drug Store, or the strip malls on 51st ave and 106th st. Instead, install some speed bumps, similar to how 109th is configured between 52 and 54 ave. It should deter traffic in a similar manner without causing a massive inconvenience to those of us living on 106th.   The bicycle lanes on 106th would / could still be kept, and it’s already quite walkable.

Principles

  • 1a. Accommodate all users by recognising the needs of all transportation types, including walking, biking, motor vehicles, and public transit.
  • 1c. Designing corridors as part of a larger network of roads, to get all people where they need to go using their choice of transportation.
  • 2. Serve as community bridges, connecting neighbours along, across and within the corridors.
  • 3. Function at the human scale, ensuring all road users feel safe in their choice of transportation.

I suggest removing bicycle lanes from 76 Ave and re-routing them along a parallel avenue (or avenues). I have seen this work in Vancouver, where there are residential streets designated as bike shared bike routes every four blocks or so. For example, in Vancouver, West Broadway is a major roadway, much like Whyte Ave, but the bike routes called “off Broadway” just one block away. This allows for easy access for cyclists to shopping and business, but provides safe passage. It also reduces frustration and concerns for motorists and bus drivers. In Vancouver,  push button crossing signals  for cyclists  are located at major roadways. For example if 78 Ave were used instead of 76, there would be a push button at 109 street.  In Vancouver, the push buttons are located on the road way so they can easily be accessed by cyclists without having to ride up on the sidewalk to push the pedestrian cross button. 1a. Accommodate all users by recognising the needs of all transportation types, including walking, biking, motor vehicles, and public transit.

Permits cyclists to feel safe using the larger network of roadways.

 

Principles

  • 1b. Accommodate all users by giving transportation priority to the most vulnerable road user (example: child over  adult, or pedestrian over cyclist.
  • 1c. Designing corridors as part of a larger network of roads, to get all people where they need to go using their choice of transportation.
  • 2. Serve as community bridges, connecting neighbours along, across and within the corridors.
  • 3. Function at the human scale, ensuring all road users feel safe in their choice of transportation.

In McKernan

Shortcutting traffic was a major problem in McKernan 20 years ago by motorists commuting to the UofA,the University Hospital, and downtown. The City, working with the community, put in place many measures to reduce the number of motorists speeding along narrow residential streets. These included one way streets (e.g., 112 street between 79 and 82 Ave), restricted turns onto residential streets (e.g., at 111 St and University Ave; 112 St and 72 Ave), restricted access to avenues from 114 St (e.g., at 79 Ave and 114 St). These measures have been very effective in creating safe residential neighborhoods and should be retained.

Principles

  • 1b. Accommodate all users by giving transportation priority to the most vulnerable road user (example: child over  adult, or pedestrian over cyclist.
  • 3. Function at the human scale, ensuring all road users feel safe in their choice of transportation.
  • 4. Act as showcase streets that celebrate the community’s beauty, history, commerce, residents,  and encourage future quality infill redevelopment. Creates safe, livable neighborhoods.

 

When sending emails to Community Partners, including a link to the Engage 106-76 web site in the email would help us quickly connect to the web site to see updates to the page. For example, the email sent on Oct 5 asked us to submit ideas.  I would have like to quickly look at the ideas posted on the web site to see what others were thinking and to check that I was not duplicating a response.  Thanks for considering.

From 106 Street to 119 Street From 106 Street to 114 Street make University Avenue very welcoming for bicycles. At 109 Street add a button on the north side of the avenue to activate the crossing light. From 114 Street to Saskatchewan Drive upgrade the side road south of University Avenue so that cyclists are safe: (1) Reposition stop signs for cars at 115 St, 115A St, and 119 St to be at the south edge of the side road instead of the south edge of University Avenue. (2) Repave the side road so it’s smooth (so cyclists don’t veer around potholes and puddles) and paint bicycle markings on it to alert drivers to share with cyclists. (3) At Saskatchewan Drive paint zebra stripes or some other markings on the crossing to the Sask. Drive trail so cars slow down as they come around the corner from Groat Road onto Saskatchewan Drive. Once University Avenue is appealing to cyclists, remove the bike lanes from 76 Avenue and restore the parking to both sides of the avenue. Cyclists and drivers will both be happier.

University Avenue from 109 St to 114 St is problematic as it is, with drivers making illegal turns onto and off it. It’s a narrow street, already with minimal access. Restricting it to bicycles (and local traffic only) would not inconvenience drivers much but would increase access and security for cyclists, especially those going to a popular destination for cyclists, the university. For east-west traffic University Avenue goes where many cyclists want to go: to the university area and to Hawrelak Park. If cyclists were encouraged to use University Avenue, 76 Avenue could be given back to cars, with parking on both sides of the road, an arrangement that would be safer for everyone.

 

Principle: 1c. Designing corridors as part of a larger network of roads, to get all people where they need to go using their choice of transportation.

On 106 street – 67th avenue

Cars and pedestrians attempting to access 106 street both north and south bound from 67th avenue from the east have a major visibility problem.  I’ve seen one accident there, the remains of another one and numerous close calls.  Extend no parking for at least one car length on 67th avenue and at least two car lengths south on 106 street from where 67th avenue enters.  Also if possible trim vegetation from the boulevard at that location.

It will increase the safety factor significantly at a very dangerous entry on to 106th street for pedestrians, bikes and cars.

Principle: 1a. Accommodate all users by recognising the needs of all transportation types, including walking, biking, motor vehicles, and public transit.

To resolve some of the parking issues, I propose that home-owners and tenants be encouraged to park in your garage.  This frees up on-street parking for visitors to the neighborhood in addition to reducing auto theft, vandalism and environmental damage (hail) to vehicles, improved snow removal and more beautiful streets and alleys.  A systematic, neighborhood-wide junk removal plan would help residents to clean out garages and yards.  Incentive could be provided with a reduction in auto insurance with proof of nightly garage parking.

Parking in your garage promotes cleaner alleys and streets.  This not only increases the beauty and re-sale value to homeowners but also discourages criminal activity (safety), frees up more parking spaces for visitors, allows more space for cyclists and promotes more efficient snow removal.

Principles

  • 1a. Accommodate all users by recognising the needs of all transportation types, including walking, biking, motor vehicles, and public transit.
  • 3. Function at the human scale, ensuring all road users feel safe in their choice of transportation.
  • 4. Act as showcase streets that celebrate the community’s beauty, history, commerce, residents,  and encourage future quality infill redevelopment.

In the Netherlands bike have the right of way all the time. Cars have to yield to bikes.

Anywhere there are extended curbs that interrupt the bike lanes, cyclists are forced to merge with cars that are going twice as fast as they are. Giving the cyclists the right of way by maintaining their lane means cars will be able to pass when it is safe to versus cyclists having to stop and merge when safe.

picture_3

Principles:

  • 1b. Accommodate all users by giving transportation priority to the most vulnerable road user (example: child over  adult, or pedestrian over cyclist.
  • 3. Function at the human scale, ensuring all road users feel safe in their choice of transportation.

 

Remove trees and parking from one side of 106 Street and widen boulevard to 6m to accommodate 3.0m wide SUP. Reduce 106 Street width to accommodate two way traffic and parking on one side.

Principles

  • 1a. Accommodate all users by recognising the needs of all transportation types, including walking, biking, motor vehicles, and public transit.
  • 1b. Accommodate all users by giving transportation priority to the most vulnerable road user (example: child over  adult, or pedestrian over cyclist.
  • 1c. Designing corridors as part of a larger network of roads, to get all people where they need to go using their choice of transportation.

All properties fronting onto 106 Street have parking at the rear of their lot with access from the back lane. Why do we need to accommodate on street parking on a collector that it attempting to accommodate all transportation modes. Removal of parking would free up 4m of the road for bikes.

Principle

  • 1a. Accommodate all users by recognising the needs of all transportation types, including walking, biking, motor vehicles, and public transit.

106 Street is a collector and is attempting to accommodate all modes of transportation. Removal of bike lanes from 106 Street to 108 Street will still accommodate all modes and be more safe.

Principles:

  • 1a. Accommodate all users by recognising the needs of all transportation types, including walking, biking, motor vehicles, and public transit.
  • 1b. Accommodate all users by giving transportation priority to the most vulnerable road user (example: child over  adult, or pedestrian over cyclist.
  • 1c. Designing corridors as part of a larger network of roads, to get all people where they need to go using their choice of transportation.

Existing sidewalks can easily be widened on both sides to 2.5m. Remove bike lanes from 106 Street and put them on widened sidewalks/SUP

Principles:

  • 1c. Designing corridors as part of a larger network of roads, to get all people where they need to go using their choice of transportation.
  • 1a. Accommodate all users by recognising the needs of all transportation types, including walking, biking, motor vehicles, and public transit.

On 76 Avenue

The bike lanes have created uncertainty for vehicular drivers. The roadway is now narrower and there is no centre line to guide drivers. Consequently, many vehicles drive down the middle, or on the bike lanes. This is dangerous for both cyclists and other drivers.

Principles

  • 3. Function at the human scale, ensuring all road users feel safe in their choice of transportation.

Currently, most of the corridor has one bike lane in each direction, separated from the rest of the road by a painted separator. This in inconvenient because a) it takes too much space away from the road; b) the resulting bike lanes are rather narrow; c) bikers  are too close ro cars. This arrangements is not safe for bikers which results in many bikers using sidewalks instead. The current layout is also very confusing for drivers, especially in winter when painted separators are covered with ice.  Based on what I have seen in other countries, I suggest a single two way bike lane, which would be separated from the road by a curb. This resolves most of the aforementioned issues. In particular, this is how it is usually done in Netherlands, where biking is very common.  An even better but more complicated solution: we could use removable separators, which can be installed for summer months and removed for winter months (as few people bike in winter and it is not safe anyway).

bicycle_lane_dronten (1)

Principles:

  • 1a. Accommodate all users by recognising the needs of all transportation types, including walking, biking, motor vehicles, and public transit.
  • 1b. Accommodate all users by giving transportation priority to the most vulnerable road user (example: child over  adult, or pedestrian over cyclist.
  • 1c. Designing corridors as part of a larger network of roads, to get all people where they need to go using their choice of transportation.
  • 2. Serve as community bridges, connecting neighbours along, across and within the corridors.
  • 3. Function at the human scale, ensuring all road users feel safe in their choice of transportation.

I agree with the principles of the Engage 106/76 Ave Project.  I do think that there also needs to be included what alternatives are encouraged for drivers who are diverted from their usual routes.  Please use or something like that.  The problem is that the traffic has to go somewhere and the major roads are already so busy that I think that there is some responsibility of the city to provide viable alternatives. This will prevent people from finding even more undesirable short cutting routes through neighbourhoods.

Physically separate two way bike lanes with parking on the other side of them. paint the bike lanes a bright green or blue. either jersey blocks or a poured curve to separate cars and bikes. works in Europe all over. clear them in winter and will be used year ’round. 1a. Accommodate all users by recognising the needs of all transportation types, including walking, biking, motor vehicles, and public transit. 1b. Accommodate all users by giving transportation priority to the most vulnerable road user (example: child over  adult, or pedestrian over cyclist.

encourage bike use in all age groups across all seasons. expands commuting choices.

Principles:

  • 1c. Designing corridors as part of a larger network of roads, to get all people where they need to go using their choice of transportation.
  • 2. Serve as community bridges, connecting neighbours along, across and within the corridors.
  • 3. Function at the human scale, ensuring all road users feel safe in their choice of transportation.
  • 4. Act as showcase streets that celebrate the community’s beauty, history, commerce, residents,  and encourage future quality infill redevelopment.

Anywhere I had a prior appointment for this Wednesday evening. I will be coming late to the meeting, which I’m disappointed  about.  I’m very concerned that the ideas for change are too constricting to the area of 106 & espcially 76th Ave.  Any idea to have less vehicles, up and down these roads, I believe isn’t a good idea.  The throughfare is a very busy road and the only access that the firetrucks have E&W to Gateway and 114th St.  To restrict them any further, I believe, would be a disservice to our emergency vehicles.  We have lovely streets and avenues in each direction that could be upgraded to be beautiful walkways and biking areas.  If we close of the major roadways N/S, E/W where will the vehicles go?  We only have 82nd Ave.  76Ave. & Argyle E/W to get to and UofA, hospitals and other venues in the campus area.  We don’t want them to be closed off for the minority of walkers and bikers to jeopardize the vehicles traveling safely.  I’d like this to be discussed.  Thanks!

Designing corridors as part of a larger network of roads, to get all people where they need to go using their choice of transportation. It is my opinion that we need to keep the roadways-roadways.  Changing our roadways is the most expensive and most likely impossible changes.  We need to keep them open for traffic.

Traffic in Edmonton is largely guided through corridors, approx. every 5-10 blocks. Neigbhourhood roads and backlanes are usually free from traffic. Rather than trying to get space for bikes on these main roads it might be easier to develop bike lanes on a parallel road or backlane. Measures requried might involve one-way traffic for cars, dedicated crossings for cyclist at main arteries, sign posting etc. This would work e.g. for 105 – along Scona school and park, would also work for University Avenue (to be fully opened for cyclists. The problem are bicycle friendly crossings, which I have not come across in this city. Crossings give typically priority to cars, cyclists have to dismount to press for change of traffic light etc. Dedicated lights for cyclists with priority for cyclists would make a big difference. This is common in many countries I have been cycling.

Many cyclists do not feel safe and do not want to use mainroads. Cycling in winter next to cars is dangerous, and it is not realistic that bicycle lanes are kept free of snow along main roads. Guiding cyclist along parallel roads might be easier.

Principles:

  • 1c. Designing corridors as part of a larger network of roads, to get all people where they need to go using their choice of transportation.
  • 2. Serve as community bridges, connecting neighbours along, across and within the corridors.
  • 3. Function at the human scale, ensuring all road users feel safe in their choice of transportation.

 

Lower the speed limit 76th ave from 109 street to 104 st Slow the speed limit to 30 km/hr (or 40 km/hr) along this stretch of road. It will be safer for children and pedestrians walking to school, cyclists using the bike lane, deter through-traffic and reduce noise levels of the busy street. Speed reduction techniques like speed-bumps could be beneficial for this purpose as well.

If all transportation users feel safe, and noise is reduced, people will utilize the street more frequently and opportunities for connecting with their neighbours are more likely.

Principles:

  • 1a. Accommodate all users by recognising the needs of all transportation types, including walking, biking, motor vehicles, and public transit.
  • 1b. Accommodate all users by giving transportation priority to the most vulnerable road user (example: child over  adult, or pedestrian over cyclist.
  • 3. Function at the human scale, ensuring all road users feel safe in their choice of transportation.
  • 4. Act as showcase streets that celebrate the community’s beauty, history, commerce, residents,  and encourage future quality infill redevelopment.

The Vision and Principles speak to accommodating all road users. To me, this means making it comfortable to cycle. One thing that would be super awesome would be foot rests that say something nice, like the ones in Copenhagen: “Hi cyclist! Rest your foot here…and thank you for cycling in our City.”
Makes people feel good and make cycling easier when you need to stop. Good places to implement this would be at major intersections with lights, such 76 Avenue at 104 Street, 109 Street, 111 Street and 114 Street. Would also be nice at 106 Street at 82 Ave, 61 Ave, 51 Ave and Whitemud.
8-foot-rest-300x200

Speeding on 76 Avenue is a common occurrence, even in the 30 km/hr schools zones.  Specifically west of the intersection at 76 Ave and 106 street, the road is much wider than the rest of 76 ave due to the fact there is no treed boulevard for 1 block between 106 St and 105 St.

When you are driving, it is easy to see this wide clear space and accelerate through it, slowing when the street narrows at the pedestrian crosswalk at 105 A.   Treed boulevards are an important and defining element in these neighbourhoods, and are proven to slow traffic, cut traffic noise, encourage pedestrian traffic, improve air quality and increase property values.  Boulevards also provide a critical space for snow.  I propose a boulevard on the south side of this block. (All Principles)

boulevard_before

Before

boulevard_after

After

As collector roads, 76 Ave and 106 street are highly visible streets, and set the tone for the neighbourhoods.  Decorative heritage street lighting along the length of these two streets will reflect the rich history of these areas, improve their aesthetics and connect these neighbourhoods together into a cohesive unit.  (Principles 3 and 4).

104-Street-Streetscape

The 4 way stop at 76 Ave and 106 St is a very dangerous intersection with frequent collisions, speeding, and vehicles driving in the dedicated bike lane to shortcut to the intersection.
Many drivers do not even stop!  I propose a small traffic circle with a central garden, making the intersection more visible, slowing vehicular traffic but keeping it moving smoothly, without abrupt starts and stops.  (principle 1) The island in the middle would be an aesthetically pleasing element, drawing attention to the intersection and defining the character of the neighbourhood. (Principles 2 and 4)
roundabout

speedhump_ottawa
106 Street and 76 Avenue have a number of schools along them, many of which are elementary school requiring roads 30 km/hr during the school year.
However, even when school is out children are still attracted to these spaces because of the playgrounds, fields and simply because it’s part of the space children use as part of their neighbourhood.
If a pedestrian gets hit at 50 km/hr, they have a 95% chance of death. At 30 km/hr, this is greatly reduced. If we are serious about making 106 Street and 76 Avenue walkable year round and not just during the school day, the road needs to be designed for a safe travel speed of 30 km/hr.
I propose use of speed tables to help keep traffic going at slower speeds while still allowing for other road users (such as bus or emergency vehicles) to get where they need to go.
This idea supports principle 1 (accommodate all users – vulnerable road users).

A few years ago the city removed parking from either side of 106 Street, from 76 Avenue to Sask. Drive (with a few exceptions near Whyte Avenu) to make room for painted bike lanes. The street currently looks like this:

106Street

The street does not meet the needs of people on bikes, because it is wide, empty, and therefore prone to speeding cars. It also does not meet the needs of residents who would like to park on the street in this busy part of the city, nor does it feel safe to cross since it is so wide.

I propose that 106 Street become a one-way street north of 77th Avenue in order to make room for a design that adheres to the first three Engage 106-76 principles while still accommodating the desire of residents to park on the street.

One lane of travel on 106 Street would take up 3 metres of space. A parking lane would take 2.4 metres, and a two-way cycle track (a segregated bike lane) would take up 3.1 metres. Together they would add up to only 8.5 metres. The street could therefore be narrowed significantly, making it easier and safer to cross, while adding parking and giving people on bikes full protection. Here is a crude 3D rendition of what a block of 106 Street might look like:

106-north-of-whyte

 

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106 Street is very narrow, and it has many demands on it. Because it is a bus route, its lanes of travel must be 3.2 metres, and because there are so many houses on it, there is a high demand for at least one lane of parking.

The Street is about 11.2 metres wide (it varies block by block). With two lanes of traffic at 3.2 metres each, and a parking lane at 2.4 metres (so 8.8 metres in total), there is only 2.4 metres for vulnerable road users (people walking, and those on bikes).

I am therefore recommending that 106 Street, for the 1.5 kilometre stretch between Argyll Road and 76 Avenue, be designed to induce driving speeds of no more than 30 km/h.

This design speed of 30 km/h would enable the street to adhere to the first three Engage 106-76 principles while still accommodating the needs of transit and the desire of residents to park on the street.

I recommend that the 30 km/h design speed be accomplished by putting a jog in the driving lanes at mid-block, alternating parking every half block, and raising the intersections. I’ve made a crude 3D rendering of the design (the road widths are to scale, the models of the cars, trees and bollards are not). Here are some screenshots:

106-Street-Rendering---Perspective

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Principle 4 – (Showcase Streets) – The Queen Alexandra Community doesn’t have community signage along its borders. It would be great to invite people into the heart of our community and help give it an identity.

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Stealth Bus

Principle 1 (Accommodate All Users) – 106th Street and 76th Avenue run through neighbourhoods lined with families and other residents. Let’s make buses on 106th Street and 76th Avenue more frequent so they are more useable (even in the winter with little babes in strollers). To keep noise levels as low as possible for those whose homes are on the street, we should get STEALTH BUSES for these routes.

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